Friday, January 16, 2015

WHAT WOULD JANE DO?


Review of WHAT WOULD JANE DO?: QUIPS AND WISDOM FROM JANE AUSTEN

It’s no secret how many women already pull quotes for fervent admiration from Jane Austen’s work. I have enjoyed what I’ve read of Austen so far and intend to eventually read everything she has written, but I’ve never been obsessed with her work. However, reading so many of her brilliantly insightful and witty quotes one after the other after the other only elevated by already high opinion of Austen and now I feel I understand how some people can be consumed with her work.

The collection organizes Austen’s copious wisdom into 10 chapters. There’s so much to love, but I pulled an excellent example from each chapter.

How to be Happier Than You Deserve:

“Your countenance perfectly informs me that you were in company last night with the person who interests you at this present time, more than all the rest of the world put together.”
- Persuasion

Good Impressions for Great Ladies:

“Every neighborhood should have a great lady.”
- Sanditon

Mistress of Myself :

“As for admiration, it was always very welcome when it came, but she did depend on it.”
- Northanger Abbey

Check Yourself, Dear:

“A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves; vanity, to what we would have others think of us.”
- Pride andPrejudice

Get to know your gentleman:

“If there is any thing disagreeable going on, men are always sure to get out of it.”
- Persuasion

If You Really Like Him:

“I suppose there may be a hundred different ways of being in love.”
- Emma

Intimate Acquaintances:

“My good qualities are under your protection, and you are to exaggerate them as much as possible; and, in return, it belongs to me to find occasion for teasing and quarreling with you as often as may be.”
- Pride and Prejudice

Sensible Quips for Every Occasion:

“I will not say that your mulberry-trees are dead, but I am afraid they are not alive.” - Letters

I’d Rather Be with a Book (unsurprisingly, my favorite section):

“How much sooner one tire of any thing than of a book! - When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.”
- Pride and Prejudice

Looking Back on Important Nothings:

“Life seems but a quick succession of busy nothings.”
- Mansfield Park

I also wanted to direct attention to some of my personal favorites:

“A fondness for reading...properly directed, must be an education in itself.”
- Mansfield Park

“I am not at all in a humour for writing; I must write on till I am.”
- Letters

“I will be calm. I will be mistress of myself.”
- Sense and Sensibility

“Silly things do cease to be silly if they are done by sensible people in an impudent way.”
- Emma

“I do not want people to be very agreeable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them a great deal.”
- Letters

I know I quoted a lot here, but believe it or not I left out so many more of my favorites. After all, this book is packed with the best of Jane Austen...so there isn’t a weak link!

No comments:

Post a Comment